By STEVE KRAUSE

On Sept. 2, 1918, just over two months before World War I would end on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, Cpl. John Enos Blocksidge of Swampscott, who had enlisted into the U.S. Army the previous April, was killed in action by enemy shell fire at the Battle of Juvigny, north of Soissons, in France.

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By Brion O’Connor

Peter Hale, one of the most decorated track and field athletes in Swampscott High School and Williams College history, was no overnight success. His first competitive foray into running was one he’d probably rather forget.

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Boston Red Sox outfielder Tony Conigliaro is carried off the field on a stretcher by teammates and the trainers of both the Red Sox and the California Angels after he was beaned by Angels pitcher Jack Hamilton in the fourth inning of their game at Fenway Park in Boston, Mass., Aug. 18, 1967. (AP Photo/Bill Chaplis)

By STEVE KRAUSE

He had been in a slump. Tony Conigliaro, the 22-year-old kid who, earlier in 1967, had become the youngest player in the history of the American League to reach the 100-homer mark, was in a rut and hadn’t hit one out in 10 days.

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By STEVE KRAUSE

Looks can be deceiving.

That’s true whether you’re sizing up a blind date or trying to figure out how healthy a person is. And it’s especially true with traumatic brain injuries — or, as they are commonly known, concussions.

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By DAVID LISCIO

Nautical historians will tell you Swampscott is best known as the New England town where the fishing dory and the lobster pot were invented.

But over the past half century, while fish stocks dwindled, the town’s interest in recreational sailing continued to grow.

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Swampscott men tackle the ‘Mount Everest of swimming’

By MEAGHAN CASEY

There will likely be jellyfish, water temperatures dipping below 60 degrees, salt-water induced swelling of lips and tongues, skin chafing and stretches of hunger and fatigue, but that won’t stop Swampscott’s Andy Jones and Tommy Gainer from attempting to swim the English Channel this summer.

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Town Barre owner Michelle Nigro opened a new Marblehead studio in late February. 

The trendy workout finds a new home locally

By MEAGHAN CASEY

Women of all ages are flocking to a new bar in town — where fitness, not alcohol, is served.

Swampscott resident Michelle Nigro opened her own studio, Town Barre, on Tioga Way in Marblehead (in the same complex as CrossFit Marblehead) in late February. She offers daily barre classes, as well as cardio dance and TRX® suspension training classes.

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From left to right: Peter Barba on the bow of the The Tioga; the boat approaching Bermuda; Josh Antrim washes a coffee pot; crew members, from left, Josh Antrim, Tom Gutermuth, John Fulghum, Peter Barba, Philip Kersten and David Liscio mark their arrival on land with a flash of a HOOMPA bumper sticker; and, Philip Kersten aloft on the sail of his 44-foot sloop. 

by DAVID LISCIO

WE WANTED TO GO TO BERMUDA.

No big deal. Friends said we could fly there from Boston in two hours. But that wasn’t what we had in mind.

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Carl Kester, a 1969 graduate of Swampscott High, is pictured (top left) with his Big Blue teammates; in his senior portrait; and on the football field (front row, far left).  

By STEVE KRAUSE

The first thing you need to know about W. Carl Kester, George Fisher Baker Jr. professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, is that he is proof that lessons learned young stay with you forever.
Now, as a professor of corporate finance for both the Harvard MBA and the Executive Education programs, he takes those lessons and applies them to 21st century business practices.

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Tom Stephens (#45) played five seasons with the Boston Patriot franchise, New England’s first professional football team.

By RICH FAHEY

They were a band of brothers, the men who first brought professional football to New England in 1960.

The Boston Patriot franchise in the American Football League was worth $250,000 that year and is now the NFL’s New England Patriots and worth $3.4 billion, according to Forbes Magazine.

Tom Stephens, 81, was a member of that team. He and his wife, Lonnie, have lived in Swampscott for more than 40 years, now splitting time between Swampscott and Naples, Fla. 

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